Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Last updated: 4 hours ago

T-Birds take to the air waves

060912rafio.jpg

BROADCASTING BONANZA: Campus radio station CiTR will be broadcasting Thunderbirds basketball, hockey, and volleyball this season. UBYSSEY FILE PHOTO/PETER KLESKEN

by Hiu Lo
Sports Writer

UBC athletics has made it easy for fans to follow the T-Birds this season after reaching agreements with Vancouver radio stations CiTR and AM730 to broadcast both men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball, men’s hockey and football throughout the upcoming seasons.

According to Scott Kobus, Business Development and Promotions Officer for UBC Athletics, UBC, SFU and TWU have been in a partnership with AM730 (formerly MOJO) for the past two years in hopes of “expanding interest and exposure” of university varsity sports.

This year, the University College of the Fraser Valley (UCFV) has jumped on board and UVic is in negotiations to join the partnership. The universities are committed to “increasing the exposure and interest in varsity athletics as a whole, which in turn will help on the individual campuses,” said Kobus. They have also collectively chosen Jim Mullin to be the quarterback that connects the different players in the partnership.

Aside from contract work with Corus Radio, play-by-play broadcaster Mullin also works as a producer on behalf of UBC, SFU, TWU and UCFV to package, present and broadcast their games on AM730. His interest in AM730 was more than just having another jig.

“It is better to have live local content than pre-recorded programs or ones from US syndication,” said Mullin.

Although it is a minor item, an added perk for AMS730 is that the universities together pay a small fee to AM730 in order to get their games to air.

“[UBC Athletics] wants a professional sound that legitimises them in the marketplace as an entertainment alternative and to position their brand beside other sports brands in the market,” said Mullin. He added they are able to achieve this in their agreement with AM730.

Kobus shares that a major benefit of having a partnership with AM730 is that it allows for greater “sponsorship opportunities,” something that UBC’s oncampus radio station, CiTR, is unable to do.

Wilson Wong, former sports director at CiTR concurs, mentioning that UBC’s deal with AM730, “allows the school’s athletic department to get their sponsors on a commercial station, which is something that [CiTR] cannot provide.”

So then, what are the benefits of having games broadcasted on CiTR?

“Students refer to CiTR as a ways of finding out what’s on campus and the general area. Having the games on [CiTR] means that UBC sports reaches people who might not otherwise even pay attention to athletic events on campus,” said Wong.

“[CiTR is] able to give more coverage of teams than just live broadcasts of games,” explained Wong. “CiTR also provides more coverage, including documentaries on historic teams, features on prominent athletes, game reports, preview, clips from athletes and coaches, and often live updates from other games on campus. No other station can provide that,” added Wong.

UBC Athletics appreciates CiTR coverage, with Kobus acknowledging that “CiTR is a great partner” and that UBC Athletics “loves having students involved in the production and broadcast of our games because [they] are always looking to grow [the] product and to provide the best possible stage for UBC student athletes to perform in.”

Kobus also shared that UBC Athletics is looking into other avenues such as video web-casting and potential TV deals to showcase their athletes. So, in the notso- distant future, T-Bird fans who can’t make it out to games may have more selection as to how they keep up to date with their favourite sport.

T-Birds take to the air waves

060912rafio.jpg

BROADCASTING BONANZA: Campus radio station CiTR will be broadcasting Thunderbirds basketball, hockey, and volleyball this season. UBYSSEY FILE PHOTO/PETER KLESKEN

by Hiu Lo
Sports Writer

UBC athletics has made it easy for fans to follow the T-Birds this season after reaching agreements with Vancouver radio stations CiTR and AM730 to broadcast both men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball, men’s hockey and football throughout the upcoming seasons.

According to Scott Kobus, Business Development and Promotions Officer for UBC Athletics, UBC, SFU and TWU have been in a partnership with AM730 (formerly MOJO) for the past two years in hopes of “expanding interest and exposure” of university varsity sports.

This year, the University College of the Fraser Valley (UCFV) has jumped on board and UVic is in negotiations to join the partnership. The universities are committed to “increasing the exposure and interest in varsity athletics as a whole, which in turn will help on the individual campuses,” said Kobus. They have also collectively chosen Jim Mullin to be the quarterback that connects the different players in the partnership.

Aside from contract work with Corus Radio, play-by-play broadcaster Mullin also works as a producer on behalf of UBC, SFU, TWU and UCFV to package, present and broadcast their games on AM730. His interest in AM730 was more than just having another jig.

“It is better to have live local content than pre-recorded programs or ones from US syndication,” said Mullin.

Although it is a minor item, an added perk for AMS730 is that the universities together pay a small fee to AM730 in order to get their games to air.

“[UBC Athletics] wants a professional sound that legitimises them in the marketplace as an entertainment alternative and to position their brand beside other sports brands in the market,” said Mullin. He added they are able to achieve this in their agreement with AM730.

Kobus shares that a major benefit of having a partnership with AM730 is that it allows for greater “sponsorship opportunities,” something that UBC’s oncampus radio station, CiTR, is unable to do.

Wilson Wong, former sports director at CiTR concurs, mentioning that UBC’s deal with AM730, “allows the school’s athletic department to get their sponsors on a commercial station, which is something that [CiTR] cannot provide.”

So then, what are the benefits of having games broadcasted on CiTR?

“Students refer to CiTR as a ways of finding out what’s on campus and the general area. Having the games on [CiTR] means that UBC sports reaches people who might not otherwise even pay attention to athletic events on campus,” said Wong.

“[CiTR is] able to give more coverage of teams than just live broadcasts of games,” explained Wong. “CiTR also provides more coverage, including documentaries on historic teams, features on prominent athletes, game reports, preview, clips from athletes and coaches, and often live updates from other games on campus. No other station can provide that,” added Wong.

UBC Athletics appreciates CiTR coverage, with Kobus acknowledging that “CiTR is a great partner” and that UBC Athletics “loves having students involved in the production and broadcast of our games because [they] are always looking to grow [the] product and to provide the best possible stage for UBC student athletes to perform in.”

Kobus also shared that UBC Athletics is looking into other avenues such as video web-casting and potential TV deals to showcase their athletes. So, in the notso- distant future, T-Bird fans who can’t make it out to games may have more selection as to how they keep up to date with their favourite sport.

T-Birds take to the air waves

060912rafio.jpg

BROADCASTING BONANZA: Campus radio station CiTR will be broadcasting Thunderbirds basketball, hockey, and volleyball this season. UBYSSEY FILE PHOTO/PETER KLESKEN

by Hiu Lo
Sports Writer

UBC athletics has made it easy for fans to follow the T-Birds this season after reaching agreements with Vancouver radio stations CiTR and AM730 to broadcast both men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball, men’s hockey and football throughout the upcoming seasons.

According to Scott Kobus, Business Development and Promotions Officer for UBC Athletics, UBC, SFU and TWU have been in a partnership with AM730 (formerly MOJO) for the past two years in hopes of “expanding interest and exposure” of university varsity sports.

This year, the University College of the Fraser Valley (UCFV) has jumped on board and UVic is in negotiations to join the partnership. The universities are committed to “increasing the exposure and interest in varsity athletics as a whole, which in turn will help on the individual campuses,” said Kobus. They have also collectively chosen Jim Mullin to be the quarterback that connects the different players in the partnership.

Aside from contract work with Corus Radio, play-by-play broadcaster Mullin also works as a producer on behalf of UBC, SFU, TWU and UCFV to package, present and broadcast their games on AM730. His interest in AM730 was more than just having another jig.

“It is better to have live local content than pre-recorded programs or ones from US syndication,” said Mullin.

Although it is a minor item, an added perk for AMS730 is that the universities together pay a small fee to AM730 in order to get their games to air.

“[UBC Athletics] wants a professional sound that legitimises them in the marketplace as an entertainment alternative and to position their brand beside other sports brands in the market,” said Mullin. He added they are able to achieve this in their agreement with AM730.

Kobus shares that a major benefit of having a partnership with AM730 is that it allows for greater “sponsorship opportunities,” something that UBC’s oncampus radio station, CiTR, is unable to do.

Wilson Wong, former sports director at CiTR concurs, mentioning that UBC’s deal with AM730, “allows the school’s athletic department to get their sponsors on a commercial station, which is something that [CiTR] cannot provide.”

So then, what are the benefits of having games broadcasted on CiTR?

“Students refer to CiTR as a ways of finding out what’s on campus and the general area. Having the games on [CiTR] means that UBC sports reaches people who might not otherwise even pay attention to athletic events on campus,” said Wong.

“[CiTR is] able to give more coverage of teams than just live broadcasts of games,” explained Wong. “CiTR also provides more coverage, including documentaries on historic teams, features on prominent athletes, game reports, preview, clips from athletes and coaches, and often live updates from other games on campus. No other station can provide that,” added Wong.

UBC Athletics appreciates CiTR coverage, with Kobus acknowledging that “CiTR is a great partner” and that UBC Athletics “loves having students involved in the production and broadcast of our games because [they] are always looking to grow [the] product and to provide the best possible stage for UBC student athletes to perform in.”

Kobus also shared that UBC Athletics is looking into other avenues such as video web-casting and potential TV deals to showcase their athletes. So, in the notso- distant future, T-Bird fans who can’t make it out to games may have more selection as to how they keep up to date with their favourite sport.

T-Birds take to the air waves

060912rafio.jpg

BROADCASTING BONANZA: Campus radio station CiTR will be broadcasting Thunderbirds basketball, hockey, and volleyball this season. UBYSSEY FILE PHOTO/PETER KLESKEN

by Hiu Lo
Sports Writer

UBC athletics has made it easy for fans to follow the T-Birds this season after reaching agreements with Vancouver radio stations CiTR and AM730 to broadcast both men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball, men’s hockey and football throughout the upcoming seasons.

According to Scott Kobus, Business Development and Promotions Officer for UBC Athletics, UBC, SFU and TWU have been in a partnership with AM730 (formerly MOJO) for the past two years in hopes of “expanding interest and exposure” of university varsity sports.

This year, the University College of the Fraser Valley (UCFV) has jumped on board and UVic is in negotiations to join the partnership. The universities are committed to “increasing the exposure and interest in varsity athletics as a whole, which in turn will help on the individual campuses,” said Kobus. They have also collectively chosen Jim Mullin to be the quarterback that connects the different players in the partnership.

Aside from contract work with Corus Radio, play-by-play broadcaster Mullin also works as a producer on behalf of UBC, SFU, TWU and UCFV to package, present and broadcast their games on AM730. His interest in AM730 was more than just having another jig.

“It is better to have live local content than pre-recorded programs or ones from US syndication,” said Mullin.

Although it is a minor item, an added perk for AMS730 is that the universities together pay a small fee to AM730 in order to get their games to air.

“[UBC Athletics] wants a professional sound that legitimises them in the marketplace as an entertainment alternative and to position their brand beside other sports brands in the market,” said Mullin. He added they are able to achieve this in their agreement with AM730.

Kobus shares that a major benefit of having a partnership with AM730 is that it allows for greater “sponsorship opportunities,” something that UBC’s oncampus radio station, CiTR, is unable to do.

Wilson Wong, former sports director at CiTR concurs, mentioning that UBC’s deal with AM730, “allows the school’s athletic department to get their sponsors on a commercial station, which is something that [CiTR] cannot provide.”

So then, what are the benefits of having games broadcasted on CiTR?

“Students refer to CiTR as a ways of finding out what’s on campus and the general area. Having the games on [CiTR] means that UBC sports reaches people who might not otherwise even pay attention to athletic events on campus,” said Wong.

“[CiTR is] able to give more coverage of teams than just live broadcasts of games,” explained Wong. “CiTR also provides more coverage, including documentaries on historic teams, features on prominent athletes, game reports, preview, clips from athletes and coaches, and often live updates from other games on campus. No other station can provide that,” added Wong.

UBC Athletics appreciates CiTR coverage, with Kobus acknowledging that “CiTR is a great partner” and that UBC Athletics “loves having students involved in the production and broadcast of our games because [they] are always looking to grow [the] product and to provide the best possible stage for UBC student athletes to perform in.”

Kobus also shared that UBC Athletics is looking into other avenues such as video web-casting and potential TV deals to showcase their athletes. So, in the notso- distant future, T-Bird fans who can’t make it out to games may have more selection as to how they keep up to date with their favourite sport.